lilliburlero:

It’s the first of September, so the trees and decorations are in the shops: nomination negotiations have begun. Things I’d like to see nominated this year:

  • Nicholas Monsarrat, The Cruel Sea and/or the film
  • E.F. Benson, David Blaize
  • Antonia Forest, Marlows series

Unless someone else does, I have to nominate The X-Files RPF. I have a Pinterest of fanfic prompts and two huge unfinished stories I need to get done. I only hope someone besides me asks for it this year. I’m moving in the direction of nominating China Beach, which means I’ve got the wrapping off my new box set and have watched the pilot episode. It has an amazing cast, including Dana Delaney as Nurse Colleen McMurphy, and Robert Picardo when he still had hair. For my third nomination, I think it’s going to be the period drama Belle(2014). Probably a long shot for actually getting fic, but you never know. I won’t nominate but I will ask for and offer The Americans, Nashville and the usual book fandoms.

stayingmedicallyinspired:

nomeremortals:

"This is a crucial role in a country where vast numbers of people are sick with chronic lifestyle-related diseases. Doctors can’t help patients change their behavior in the 15 minutes they spend with each patient. But community health workers can."

I’ll be meeting these Penn Community Health Workers during their training in October, and I’m very excited to learn more about the parts of Philadelphia they will be impacting this year. Great article!

(via nursingisinmyblood)

4fandoms1girl:

The X-Files - 1x1 “Pilot”

The pilot episode for my favorite series. Technically, the production code for TXF pilot is 1x79, at least that’s the case with my region one DVDs. I have no idea why that is (anyone?) but “Deep Throat” is 1x01. Is this inconsistent from region to region? I’ve heard the episode order isn’t always the same. [x]

(via x-filesforever)

"

Olivia, my eldest daughter, caught measles when she was seven years old. As the illness took its usual course I can remember reading to her often in bed and not feeling particularly alarmed about it. Then one morning, when she was well on the road to recovery, I was sitting on her bed showing her how to fashion little animals out of coloured pipe-cleaners, and when it came to her turn to make one herself, I noticed that her fingers and her mind were not working together and she couldn’t do anything.

“Are you feeling all right?” I asked her.

“I feel all sleepy, ” she said.

In an hour, she was unconscious. In twelve hours she was dead.

The measles had turned into a terrible thing called measles encephalitis and there was nothing the doctors could do to save her.

That was twenty-four years ago in 1962, but even now, if a child with measles happens to develop the same deadly reaction from measles as Olivia did, there would still be nothing the doctors could do to help her.

On the other hand, there is today something that parents can do to make sure that this sort of tragedy does not happen to a child of theirs. They can insist that their child is immunised against measles. I was unable to do that for Olivia in 1962 because in those days a reliable measles vaccine had not been discovered. Today a good and safe vaccine is available to every family and all you have to do is to ask your doctor to administer it.

It is not yet generally accepted that measles can be a dangerous illness.

Believe me, it is. In my opinion parents who now refuse to have their children immunised are putting the lives of those children at risk.

In America, where measles immunisation is compulsory, measles like smallpox, has been virtually wiped out.

Here in Britain, because so many parents refuse, either out of obstinacy or ignorance or fear, to allow their children to be immunised, we still have a hundred thousand cases of measles every year.

Out of those, more than 10,000 will suffer side effects of one kind or another.

At least 10,000 will develop ear or chest infections.

About 20 will die.

LET THAT SINK IN.

Every year around 20 children will die in Britain from measles.

So what about the risks that your children will run from being immunised?

They are almost non-existent. Listen to this. In a district of around 300,000 people, there will be only one child every 250 years who will develop serious side effects from measles immunisation! That is about a million to one chance. I should think there would be more chance of your child choking to death on a chocolate bar than of becoming seriously ill from a measles immunisation.

So what on earth are you worrying about?

It really is almost a crime to allow your child to go unimmunised.

"

Roald Dahl, 1986

(via brain-confetti)

TEAM VACCINE

(via watchoutfordinosaurs)

NINETEEN EIGHTY SIX.

roald dahl was calling out the anti-vaccination movement as self indulgent bullshit //thirty god damn years ago//.

(via ultralaser)

Over 1,000 preventable deaths and 128,000 preventable illnesses since 2007 and counting

And this is only in recent history. I can’t imagine the numbers if we had data all the way back to 1986.

(via autistiel)

And thanks to anti-vaxxers, measles is back in the United States.

(via thebicker)

(via nursingisinmyblood)

latimespast:

"There must have been 50,000 marchers" in the 1937 Labor Day parade in downtown Los Angeles, according to Secretary J. W. Buzzell of Central Labor Council.
For years, major parades were held in downtown L.A. to mark the holiday. See some of them here, and read more about 1937’s celebration.
Photo: Los Angeles Times archive / UCLA

latimespast:

"There must have been 50,000 marchers" in the 1937 Labor Day parade in downtown Los Angeles, according to Secretary J. W. Buzzell of Central Labor Council.

For years, major parades were held in downtown L.A. to mark the holiday. See some of them here, and read more about 1937’s celebration.

Photo: Los Angeles Times archive / UCLA

theweekmagazine:

These real-life Rosie the Riveters changed the face of labor

Vintage photos from the library of congress capture a time when the country ran on womanpower

[description: 2 gifs-The X-Files, season one, Mulder looking down at Scully and Scully looking up at Mulder.]

(Source: foxsmulder, via allthewayfrombelfast)

memories-child:

The meta I wrote for LJ’s xf-is-love a couple of years ago has been posted to the Fan Meta Reader.

Coincidentally xf-is-love is open for sign ups at the moment. You know you want to.

Here is The X-Files Love Month sign-up post. Come join us. This year, in addition to the daily member posts, we’re rewatching all of season two. There will be a fanworks request post, including a retro fic challenge: The X-Files, any episode, in 155 words. We’re also planning a trivia contest with prizes!

.
science-junkie:

An identification chart of 42 North American butterflies.
By artist Eleanor Lutz. You can find the full sized GIF here or pick up a poster for your room here.

science-junkie:

An identification chart of 42 North American butterflies.

By artist Eleanor Lutz. You can find the full sized GIF here or pick up a poster for your room here.

nprglobalhealth:

Peter Piot and his colleagues were looking at samples from a Belgian nun who had died of a disease in Congo. The question he thought he was trying to answer: Was it yellow fever? 
Instead it was a new disease.
Read more and listen to the interview: The Co-Discoverer Of Ebola Never Imagined An Outbreak Like This

nprglobalhealth:

Peter Piot and his colleagues were looking at samples from a Belgian nun who had died of a disease in Congo. The question he thought he was trying to answer: Was it yellow fever? 

Instead it was a new disease.

Read more and listen to the interview: The Co-Discoverer Of Ebola Never Imagined An Outbreak Like This